Wedge Anchors

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304 SS Wedge Anchor
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316 SS Wedge Anchor
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Wedge Anchor, Plated
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Wedge Anchor Basics

Wedge Anchors are a non-bottom bearing, wedge-style expansion anchor for use in solid concrete or grout-filled concrete masonry. A one-piece clip ensures uniform holding capacity that increases as tension is applied. Installation is simple, utilizing standard hole sizes equal to the anchor bolt diameter. Wedge Anchors are among the most common and economical anchoring option for existing concrete.

Common Materials & Finishes of Wedge Anchors

Wedge anchors are available in different materials and finishes based on the mechanical and chemical properties of the material, and the intended application of the wedge anchor.

304 Stainless Steel Wedge Anchors

303/304 stainless steel fasteners are commonly used in applications that require general atmospheric corrosion resistance, such as chemical and food processing equipment. Stainless steel has a higher corrosion resistance than carbon steel.

316 Stainless Steel Wedge Anchors

316 stainless steel fasteners are commonly used in applications that require general atmospheric corrosion resistance, such as chemical and food processing equipment. 316 stainless steel has a higher corrosion resistance than 18-8 or 304 stainless steel.

Galvanized Wedge Anchors

Carbon steel wedge anchors are coated with a sacrificial zinc coating that acts as an anode to prevent the fastener underneath from corroding.

  • Mechanical galvanizing is a mechanically-applied zinc coating that meets the requirements of ASTM B695, Class 55, which is a minimum average thickness of 55 microns with a supplementary overcoat. Wedge anchors are tumbled in a barrel with a mixture of water, zinc powder, other chemicals and glass beads to evenly apply the coating.

Plated Wedge Anchors

Carbon Steel wedge anchors are coated with a thin layer of zinc, typically via electroplating.

  • Plated wedge anchors will not corrode as quickly when covered with this protective coating, even when a scratch or cut exposes the steel to air or moisture. The zinc or cadmium plating will always tarnish and corrode first.